The End Is Near and It's Going to Be Awesome: How Going Broke Will Leave America Richer, Happier, and More Secure

The End Is Near and It s Going to Be Awesome How Going Broke Will Leave America Richer Happier and More Secure In The End Is Near and It s Going to Be Awesome Kevin Williamson a National Review Online contributor makes the bold argument that the United States government is disintegrating and that it is a go

  • Title: The End Is Near and It's Going to Be Awesome: How Going Broke Will Leave America Richer, Happier, and More Secure
  • Author: Kevin D. Williamson
  • ISBN: 9780062220707
  • Page: 262
  • Format: ebook
  • In The End Is Near and It s Going to Be Awesome, Kevin Williamson, a National Review Online contributor, makes the bold argument that the United States government is disintegrating and that it is a good thing Williamson offers a radical re envisioning of government, a powerful analysis of why it doesn t work, and an exploration of the innovative solutions to various socialIn The End Is Near and It s Going to Be Awesome, Kevin Williamson, a National Review Online contributor, makes the bold argument that the United States government is disintegrating and that it is a good thing Williamson offers a radical re envisioning of government, a powerful analysis of why it doesn t work, and an exploration of the innovative solutions to various social problems that are spontaneously emerging as a result of the failure of politics and government.Critical and compelling, The End Is Near and It s Going to Be Awesome How Going Broke Will Leave America Richer, Happier, and More Secure lays out a thoughtful plan for a new system, one based on success stories from around the country, from those who home school their children to others who have successfully created their own currency.

    • ½ The End Is Near and It's Going to Be Awesome: How Going Broke Will Leave America Richer, Happier, and More Secure || ☆ PDF Read by ↠ Kevin D. Williamson
      262 Kevin D. Williamson
    • thumbnail Title: ½ The End Is Near and It's Going to Be Awesome: How Going Broke Will Leave America Richer, Happier, and More Secure || ☆ PDF Read by ↠ Kevin D. Williamson
      Posted by:Kevin D. Williamson
      Published :2018-09-25T16:51:20+00:00

    One thought on “The End Is Near and It's Going to Be Awesome: How Going Broke Will Leave America Richer, Happier, and More Secure”

    1. This is quite a good book - and probably the closest thing to anarchist literature I will ever say that about. The book isn't subdivided this way, but I felt like it went through roughly three movements.1. Why politics is bad.2. How politics is failing.3. What we can do about it.The arguments made under heading #1 will seem quite familiar to many. First, much of the world around us is simply too complicated to be planned by a few people on high - the recently resurrected "I, Pencil" (youtu/IYO3t [...]

    2. Very interesting book.The author is a journalist and I bought the book after hearing him speak. His talk was not the greatest - he did not seem to really enjoy being there and giving a lecture. But his approach to issues, his bias toward or personal commitment to the value of freedom and demonstrating the negatives of bureaucracy and general government controls endeared me to him in any case. Also the title, the frightening realism and still optimism combined had me very intrigued.I don't want t [...]

    3. Kevin Williamson has written a political treatise for the 21st century. Teachers, politicians, law enforcement officers and other government employee should avoid this book. You are rightly portrayed as obstacles to a more inclusive and productive society. The first part of the book lays out a foundation for a better system of government. It is not political in the sense of Republicans, Democrats or even Libertarians. Instead, he recognizes the boundary between a less intrusive government and mo [...]

    4. Enjoyed this one very much. As one economist put it, anything that can't go on indefinitely, won't.

    5. My 15 year old daughter said to me the other day that she had read an article online that stated if the minimum wage in the US was raised to $15/hr, there would be far less poverty and a more equal distribution of wealth from the rich to the poor. Being cynical by nature, I explained to her that if the Fry Cooks at McDonald's were making $15/hr, a Big Mac would soon cost $9 and this would disproportionately affect the lower income families who might eat out at the chain; the bottom line is, the [...]

    6. I was visiting my parents and flipping channels in the guest room when I saw this author speak on CSPAN-2. I was intrigued by his talk, so I downloaded and read the book on the strength of that. I'm always up for some nutty libertarianism.The gist of this book is that government will eventually collapse under the weight of its own obligations (social security, pensions, Medicare, Obamacare). But don't worry about this because government will be replaced with a much smaller government and America [...]

    7. As a Libertarian I'm wary of those who play with data to make their point. Mr. Williamson's analysis are trite and quite flimsy. For example he claims the amount owed in entitlements is more than all the material wealth in the world. This is a true statement. He follows up that if a family were to invest 10% of their income at 5% rate of return then they will exceed the amount they would have received in entitlements and they could bequeath it to their heirs. Really? Somehow this investment in p [...]

    8. Interesting, but relatively disappointing. Kevin Williamson's thoughts on the state of America and the possible future are much more analytical than prescriptive or predictive; that is, his explanation of what politics really is about is much substantive and deep than the ideas he offers on what the future American society, economy and governmental structures will be like after--as he obviously accepts as a given--the American economy and government collapse after going broke.Very quotable.The b [...]

    9. Kevin D. Williamson is, for a Gloomy Gus, rather unfashionably upbeat. I recently read Mark Steyn's "After America" which, while trenchant and darkly funny, was resolutely downbeat about the future of the USA. I liked that Williamson saw a light at the end of the tunnel, citing America's long tradition of mutual aid societies like the Elks and the Masons and help from extended families as a possible way forward when the federal government collapses under its own weight.Local is always more effic [...]

    10. Smart, funny, and highly recommended reading for everyone.This book was not what I expected. Williamson explains why politics is a poor provider of health insurance, education, and other public goods, and discusses alternative ways that people can freely associate together to provide those things, especially in light of new information technologies. Essentially, this book is a libertarian manifesto for America's future, after "the end." The only problem is that Williamson gives no suggestion how [...]

    11. I really enjoyed this book. Even if you are not a political/economics geek you should read it for a fresh look at the intersection of politics and economics and what our "choices" will be when the country's overwhelming overspending comes crashing to a halt.

    12. Just reviewed a part of this book related to Medicare and our healthcare system in general. I've copied some pages worth reading, here as well as Facebook since Facebook will probably delete or edit my post:“CHAPTER 5Health Care Is a PencilThe Buddha’s teachings were founded on the awareness of the three impediments of old age, sickness, and death. The Enlightened One, if he had meditated on it, would not necessarily have rejected a technical solution.—MICHEL HOUELLEBECQ, THE ELEMENTARY PA [...]

    13. A Review: The End Is Near and It's Going to Be Awesome: How Going Broke Will Leave America Richer, Happier, and More Secure by Kevin D. WilliamsonThis book came to my attention when I heard the author being interviewed on the radio. The title intrigued me and he seemed an erudite enough fellow so I was persuaded to purchase his work. I am glad to have learned from the more interesting parts of this book but will have to give it an overall poor rating.Let’s begin with what I found to be positiv [...]

    14. First, the good. Kevin D. Williamson has written an accessible, insightful book on politics and economics and how if we could free the latter from the former we would all be better off. He starts by laying out the basic argument that government is a form of coercion hardly different from a mafia-style protection racket and that the so-called "social contract" is one of the only binding contracts for which consent is not required. He adeptly explains why this form of providing goods and services [...]

    15. I doubt that anyone who does not fancy themselves a libertarian, or at least is not willing to contemplate a philosophy of minimal government interference (in all domains: economic, social, etc), would like this book as much as I did. But I wish those people would choose to read it anyway, because it presents a strong case for: (a) a libertarian philosophy; and (b) the inevitability that government WILL shrink, because we can't afford for it to do otherwise, at some point.Much of the book is jus [...]

    16. Kevin Williamson is one of my favorite bloggers on the National Review Online site. He focuses on one of my main worries--the horrible expanding deficit--and provides useful facts and analysis. So when he came out with a book (The End Is Near And It's Going To Be Awesome) I was immediately interested. I read the Kindle sample, liked it, and bought the whole thing.Now I've finished it and I'm very disappointed. The book has three main points:1. There's no way the US government can keep the promis [...]

    17. I think that the book can be summarized more in terms of the first four words of its title than it can be by the rest of it. Is the end near? Well, the end has already happened in Detroit, which filed for bankruptcy--in part because it could not pay its bills, but in large part because it could not raise the taxes needed to pay its bills. Williamson argues that governments fail because they don't have enough information to be responsive to consumer needs, the way that big businesses are. (Not th [...]

    18. Accepting the premise that the United States is going to go broke sooner rather than later, causing it to default on many of its obligations, this book examines how other entities beside the federal government could do a better job of accomplishing the tasks that a insolvent government couldn't.He begins by pointing out a simple fact: the difference between government and the Mafia is littler than you think. Both enforce their diktats ultimately at the endpoint of a gun. Both assumed power viole [...]

    19. Politics is broken. But you knew that. If you think about politics or follow politics or look at politics out of the corner of your eye, you might have gotten the impression that finding the right politics will somehow fix things, for various values of "fix" and "things." Williamson is here to say, "Not so much."Not only is politics broken, Williamson writes, but the system and moreover, the metasystem, is broken and incapable if being fixed. Politics cannot learn and therefore will always do ba [...]

    20. An incredibly sagacious book which from the very beginning wants to rack your brain with the question, "Just what do we need a government for anyways?" Williamson is by no means an anarchist but someone who wants people everywhere to sit back and think about why things are the way they are, and just how much better they would be if we just took care of our problems ourselves.Regarding the title, Williamson is speaking primarily of the Social Security and Medicare systems whose combined liabiliti [...]

    21. 2.5 stars, barely edging up to 3. If the book had delivered on what the title promised, it could well have been 4. They key promise of the title is "How", showing us how the end might come and how things might turn out better afterwards. Instead of that, we get long diatribes about why current systems are broken and descriptions of what *should* be done instead, presumably arising naturally somehow from the end. Although some effort is made to remain party neutral in these solutions, they are mo [...]

    22. I enjoy reading Williamson's work, even though he often takes a bit of a condescending look at the opposition. He's also got a pretty good sense of humor to go along with that. I suppose that's something you have to develop as a defense mechanism when you get the same unfounded insults hurled at you again and again.The last book I read from Williamson was about the failing of Socialism, kind of a Socialism 101. This one is designed more as to why Classical Liberalism is pretty darn decent.His id [...]

    23. This very readable and persuasive book makes a case that the provision of various services to the public by governments in general (and the US government in particular) is not merely inefficient, incompetent, and undesirable; but is destined to be drastically curtailed fairly soon, as these services become unsustainable.The author believes this will be a Good Thing in the long run, because those services can then be provided in better ways.He's pretty good at describing the awfulness of the curr [...]

    24. A good number of ideas, mostly conservative (i.e free market, non-governmental) solutions to existing problems: health care, social security, education, and other things that have too much government interference are getting more expensive to the point of being unsustainable and less accessible to all but the elite (even while hi-tech items get cheaper and more egalitarian by the year). Indeed, it will be most interesting to see, not just *if* these doomsday scenarios (as the title implies) will [...]

    25. The End is Near is an interesting book, written for popular consumption. It contained quite a bit of information I was unaware of, such as an early purpose of fraternal orders such as the Elks to provide a form of medical insurance for their members prior to WWII, or the percentage of public school teachers in large urban areas who prefer to put their own children into private schools. My only disappointment was in Williamson's conclusions, which, to be honest, I expected going into the book. Wi [...]

    26. Just finished a great book called The End is Near and It's Going to be Awesome by Kevin D. Williamson. You should check it out. It DID help me to look at things from a third perspective - not left or right, very much Constitutionally, but with ideas that need to be brought forward. We need to work harder to present these and other options - because lets face it - the Republican party has become Democrat Light. They have revealed themselves to be just as BIG GOVERNMENT as the other side. Williams [...]

    27. Yuck. This book is just rubbish. My favorite passage about libraries below from pgs. 90-91:"Privately funded and volunteer-staffed public libraries were the norm fro many years, from magnificent ones such as the New York Public Library to modest ones throughout suburbs and small towns across the country. At the apogee of WASP society-lady culture, volunteering at the local library was practically a rite of passage, an entrée into more prestigious charitable work Somehow, as library budgets ball [...]

    28. Williamson is one of my favorite columnists because he's smart, he knows a lot, and when he makes a point he uses a rapier. This book is full of content (the unfunded liabilities of the US are greater than all the wealth IN THE WORLD, the MEDIAN income in the Fabulous Fifties was $10,000 in today's dollars) and full of good stories and I wish I could get some of my nearest and dearest to read it, but like most people he's better at seeing the flaws in things than coming up with alternate approac [...]

    29. Kevin Williamson's book establishes the failures of the welfare state as we know it, but fully underestimates the way the collapse of the welfare state will play out. His idea that a libertarian smaller state will emerge is totally flawed. Instead an authoritarian dystopia is what is likely to happen with falling standards of living, generations pitted against one another, and perhaps violence between rent-seeking groups fighting over a shrinking pie. There are some interesting policy prescripti [...]

    30. I really enjoyed this book. There are so many great incites and conclusions all of which America (and the rest of the world) will have to face in the coming years. The end of politics as we know is near, and those of us who see it coming better get prepared.I wish the author had spent more time on the "and It's Going to be Awesome" part of the title. Most of the book dealt with what is wrong and why, which was all good stuff. But, how is all of this bad news going to be awesome? What makes the a [...]

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